Oral history interview with Lucille Thornburgh, Textile Workers" Union of America
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Oral history interview with Lucille Thornburgh, Textile Workers" Union of America

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Published by Microfilming Corporation of America in Sanford, N.C .
Written in English


Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby June Rostan.
SeriesThe Twentieth century trade union woman ;, no. 37, New York Times oral history program
ContributionsRostan, June.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsMicrofiche 2478 (H)
The Physical Object
FormatMicroform
Pagination2 microfiches
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3211790M
LC Control Number83118935

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Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU), former union of garment and apparel workers in the United States and was formed in by the merger of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), a large union representing workers in the men’s clothing industry, with the Textile Workers Union of America, a smaller union founded in Collection consists of transcripts of 61 oral history interviews with women workers, labor leaders, and activists representing varied geographic, work, racial, and ethnic backgrounds and union affiliations. "The Twentieth Century Trade Union Woman: Vehicle for Social Change," eventually formed the basis for the book, History. In the. "Twentieth Century Trade Union Women: Vehicle for Social Change" Oral History Transcripts # OHT. Kheel Center for Labor-Management Documentation and Archives, Cornell University Library.   In this interview, he describes his role in the formation of a local union at American Viscose in Roanoke, Virginia, and his work with the Textile Workers Union of America towards organizing textile workers throughout the South. Working Conditions Oral History Interview with Cary J. Allen Jr., April 3, Interview H

During the 19th century, women entered factories in large numbers, working fourteen hours a day, six days a week in dangerous jobs for low pay. In response to these conditions, young female textile workers organized America’s first industrial protests, strikes, and reform groups. Learn about this topic in these articles: Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. In Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union by the merger of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA), a large union representing workers in the men’s clothing industry, with the Textile Workers Union of America, a smaller union founded in In the s and s, the textile industry's workforce underwent a dramatic transformation, as African Americans entered the South's largest industry in growing numbers. Only percent of textile workers were black in ; by , this number had risen to 25 percent. Using previously untapped legal records and oral history interviews, Timothy Minchin crafts a compelling account of the. The NSDTWA was formed to honor those American textile workers whose contribution to our culture is a legacy of hard work, patriotism, and family strength. The history of the sacrifices made by our parents and ancestors during the American Industrial Revolution must never be forgotten.

International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union (ILGWU). This interview is available in Catherwood Library on microfiche. 2 6 Elizabeth Nord Interviewed by James Findlay, Gary Julik, Christion Simmons, and Judy Smith Textile Workers' Union of America (TWUA). This interview was marked restricted as of Oral History Interview with Mareda Sigmon Cobb and Carrie Sigmon Yelton, June 16 Interview H Virginia, and his work with the Textile Workers Union of America towards organizing textile workers throughout the South. Oral History Interview with Mattie Shoemaker and Mildred Shoemaker Edmonds, Ma Interview H The AMALGAMATED CLOTHING AND TEXTILE WORKERS UNION was organized nationally in as the independent Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA). An early supporter of industrial unionism, the ACWA scored some initial success when it came to Cleveland in the s, but organizing was hindered by a recession in the industry in the s.   Eyes on North Carolina Textile workers built unions, led major strikes and fought racism starting in the s in the South’s largest industry. The heaviest concentration of textile mills was in North Carolina. Charlotte was the Southern industry’s center point since its inception during the post-Reconstruction era, with many factories.